Essay Example on the Power of the Media

2021-07-13 06:28:30
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University of California, Santa Barbara
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Essay
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In the 60s there was a struggle for power between the media and the world of politics. The contest was based on the influence each has on the public opinion. This dispute was initiated in 1969 by Spiro Agnew on the major television news networks, nation's media and on prominent newspapers. Glen considered a response to the media's critics of President Nixon's Vietnam speech. Glen attacked the media for irresponsible actions and erroneous reporting, evoking emotions in most parts of the nation. Glen not only attacked the press and television media but also attacked their owners and commentators directly. He focused on the importance the media in providing information to the people and the presence of bias in reporting as a result of newspersons and commentators practicing censorship. Glen wanted citizens to press the news media for responsible reporting. As a result, a large segment of the society saw Agnew as their representative, a person who spoke out for the values they believed. Agnew was aware of the beliefs and attitudes of the people who encompassed his audience. Thus, the setting of Agnew's speech showed the general mood of people in both the private and public sectors.

Glen Beck focused primarily on using arguments, presenting evidence and supporting his evidence. In his episode he justifies the influence that the media has in the public domain. He actively negates his opposition by arguing that the news media acts as a catalyst of actions and more concerned about what sells and not what news is important. He also maintains that bad news as portrayed by the media drives out good news because the news media had accused him of polarizing the nation yet others who voice their sentiments receive little or no critics from the press. Through this comparison, Glen considers himself as the martyr, and it is his responsibility as a leader to voice his opinion. It is important to note that Glens first attack of the news media. Although Glen incorporated the use of deductive reasoning, it may be difficult to follow because his major arguments were on media biases and reform. His conclusion was based on the moral responsibility of the American people. However, his problem was the biases and censorship on the news.

Glen uses emotional appeal or pathos to anger Americans into change. Those who were not part of the solution become part of his problem. His persuasive technique greatly reduced the appeal as he created more enemies than supporters. Probably, he lost the attention of Americans who did not hold onto his beliefs and attitudes. If his use of pathos could have been mild and appealed to both sides, his message could have been widely accepted. His pathos portrayal was that of a typical politician. He formulated a belief that America was primarily undermined by the great evil of the news media and it was the duty of the people to react accordingly to the dilemma. Although Glen was actually in attacking the media, it was probably not effective as he intended.

Glen uses ethos the weakest form of proof from the speech. His prior reputation and extrinsic ethos did not have a significant impact or were extremely weak. Democrats saw Agnew as a weak, and his radicalism made many to take another view. His rhetoric speech bordered the realm of war rhetoric. The threat appeal included the content of the persuasive communication that described the alleged result of the speech. Glen convinced his audience that the news media allow particular evils like biases, censorship and media monopoly leading to the continuous decline of American values. Therefore, Glens primary objective was to make people not to put their trust on the media as he continues to push for the reforms. This depicts Glen's struggle to maintain the status quo in the 60s. His discourse was mainly a response to the critic's president Nixon got from the news media. Although Agnew tried to polarize his audience, it was hard to see the influence that polarization had on his audience. If his use of pathos could have been mild and appealed to both sides, his message could have been widely accepted. His pathos portrayal was that of a typical politician. He formulated a belief that America was primarily undermined by the great evil of the news media and it was the duty of the people to react accordingly to the dilemma. Glen knew his audience and knew what to be done for the nation to strengthen its moral position. No doubt, the speech allowed the citizens to look more carefully the biases of the news commentators. His threats against the new media must have become subtle submissions of likely intimidation for people who disagreed with the government.

 

Reference

Agnew, S. T. (1969, November 13). Television News Coverage delivered 13 November 1969, Des Moines, Iowa. Retrieved from http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/spiroagnewtvnewscoverage.htm

 

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